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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
insisted the sweeping health care law is working and asked supporters to spread the word about benefits of the affordable care act. >> we may never satisfy the laws of opponents. that is fair to say. some are rooting for it to fail. that's not my opinion, by the way, they say it pretty explicitly. some convinced themselves the law has failed regardless of the evidence, but i would advice them to check with the people who are here today. and the people they represent all across the country whose lives have been changed for the better by the affordable care act. >> north korea's leader is believed to have sacked his powerful uncle shown here on the left from the top level government post while two ally haves been publicly executed according to south korean lawmakers briefed by south korea's intel again see. >>> french prosecutors investigating bob dillon on suspicion of insighting hatred. a group representing croatians for comments he made. dillon is accused on likening the croatian people. >>> one of princess dianna's most memorable dresses sold at auction in south london for a whopping
and studying law, mandela's trouble making politics began and as a boxer he became adapt to picking fights and sparring with authorities that increased its oppression against the black population. it was then mandela made the crucial decision to take up an armed struggle launching the armed wing. he was militant and a fire brand, defined burning his passbook, a document the authorities use to control the movement of south africa's black population. >> the africans require want to franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. they want political independence. >> reporter: that simple demand and the methods he took to fight for come mock see he and others tried for treegen and sabotage, acts punishment by day. he got life in prison anyway. one of the most countries and isolated prisons. another political prisoner remembers the first time he saw mandela in the prison yard. >> i could see from the way he walked and from his conduct that he was a man already stamping his authority on prison regime. >> reporter: mandela was released 27 years later. >> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. y
and studying law, as a boxer, he became adepth at pecking fights and sparking fights with authorities which had increased against the black population. it was then mandela became the crucial struggle to launch american national congress's when. he was mill and the and a fire brand, defiantly burning his passbook, a dreaded document the authorities used to control the move him of south africa's black population. >> the africans require want a franchise on the basis of one man one vote. they want political independence. >> reporter: that simple demand and the efforts mandela took to fight for democracy eventually saw him and others tried for treason and sabotaged by the apartheid government, acts punishable by death. they were banished to robben island, one of the most brutal and isolated prisons. another political prisoner remembers the first time he saw mandela in a prison yard. >> i could see from the way he walked and from his conduct that here was a man already stamping his authority on prison regime. >> reporter: mandela was released 27 years later. >> i have spoken about freedom in my life
. >>> robin joins me again and charles ogletree, professor at harvard law school. one activist said moral leaders go to places that are sometimes unlikely and unexpected for their cause. it's okay to see them as a hero but a hero with flaws. what do you make of that statement? >> i think he's a great hero, and i think the flaws need to be taken into context. he's a man who suffered a lot, spent 27 years in jail, treated differently because he was a part of the apartheid system, many people in africa didn't have support. i like what he was able to do and he's a chance sended guy who will have impact not just now but well into the 21st and 22 nd century because of what he's able to do. >> it's interesting to see throughout the history of the struggle, professor ogletree, the defy yens, campaign, working with colored south africans, indians to get a unified response and then the evolution from non-violence from civil disobedience to an armed struggle when they found they basically couldn't get any headway using civil disobedience. >> right, and i think the thing that's missing in a lot of th
or derailment. congress passed a law in 2008 that gave the rail way or the freight train time to install them. >> jason joins us now from the crash scene. so we're learning more tonight about the cell phone, whether or not the engineer was on it when the train crashed. what have you learned about it? >> yeah, anderson, a lot of questions about it. i can tell you that a senior law enforcement spokesperson told cnn they have no reason to believe the train engineer was actually on his cell phone during the time of the derailment. and actually, anderson, speaking to another investigator out here, they tell me there are a lot of moving parts to the investigation, one investigator telling me it is just too soon to have the definitive parts. >> all right, jay, thank you very much. and one commuter on her way to work, before you meet her, this was the car she was in on its side. there was a rows of seats on the left and right. the carry-on rack on the right. amanda, i'm so glad you're okay. how are you holding up? >> physically, i am relatively unscathed, and unbelievably so. emotionally, i probably
the laws to go one way or the other. >> i feel like it's my job. i feel like i see something very wrong here that from my perspective, mental health provider can't intervene effectively and that's why a lot of these things happened. there needs to be procedures that allows the people who know the difference to do their job. >> i want to give you a different set of facts when we were covering bosnia. i used to be infuriated when editors would say that such and such piece of video cannot be played because it's just too gruesome. i said hang on a second. that's the reality. by telling our stories, it did in the end change the reality and it changed the action and intervention and move the story along. i am deeply conflicted about this. it's a matter of safety and helping the families. >> you can make the argument that you don't want to hear them and a program doesn't want to play them and it's not going to. that there is the right to have them be released. you don't want the government holding on and hiding whatever it may be. >> that's an important principal and i thought it was wrong tha
. >> to push change, to say -- >> it's not about pushing change. >> to say we want laws to go one way or the other -- >> i feel like it's my job. >> that's right. >> i feel like i see something very wrong here from my prospective mental health providers and physicians can't intervene effectively. that's why a lot of these things happened. there needs to be a procedure put in place that protects people and allows people that know the difference to do their job. >> i just want to give you an example from a completely different set of facts covering bosnia and horrors in the field. i used to be infuriated when editors would say that such and such piece of video cannot be played because it's just too grew some. i say, hang on a second, that's the reality. by selling stories, it did in the end change the reality and changed the action and intervention and we moved the story along. so i'm very deeply conflicted about this. for me, genuinely it's a matter of taste and respecting the families one year on. >> but also, i think to jeffrey's point, about you can make the argument that you don't
given the name nelson by a school teacher later on. after moving to johannesburg and studying law, as a boxer he would pick fights and sparring with the apartheid authorities which had increased. he was militant and a fire brand and burning his passbook a dreaded boumt the apartheid authorities used to control the movements of south africa's black population. >> the africans require the franchise on the ages of one man, one vote. >> reporter: that simple demand and methods mandela took to fight for democracy saw him and others tried for treason. but they got life in prison instead and to robben island. another political prisoner remembers the first time he saw mandela in the prison yard. >> i could see from the way he walked and from his conduct that he was a man already stamping his authority on prison regime. >> reporter: mandela was relieved 27 years later. >> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. your commitment at your discipline has released me to stand before you today. >> reporter: his lack of bitterness toward the apartheid authorities helped him lead one of the rem
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)